Imagining Possibilities: Repurposing & Not a Box

This week, the focus of my lessons with my K-2 students was our first STEM class principle — Imagine Possibilities. My goal in structuring these lessons was getting students producing lots of possible ideas and then choosing one (or more) to explore.

My three second grade classes completed a simple repurposing activity, which also tied in with our yearlong focus on resources. We reviewed the terms reduce, reuse, recycle and then learned the new word repurpose. Students then got to choose an item from a bin containing all sorts of boxes, containers, and other miscellany that I’d been diverting from my recycling bin for a few weeks. Their excitement about getting to repurpose grew as the week went on — when I was walking groups of students to my classroom, the kiddos in the front of the line would ask, “Are we going to be making things like the other kids did?” My hope is that their interest in repurposing will spill over into their home lives, as it’s such a simple (and cost-effective) way to get kids making and engineering.

Here’s a look of some of their final products — I was blown away by their creativity!


Meanwhile, with kindergarten, I tackled “Imagining Possibilities” with a favorite lesson framed around Antoinette Portis’ Not a Box. I gave each of my kindergarten students half a cereal box (I have over 50 kindergarteners and my stock of boxes didn’t run deep enough!) and encouraged them to use it to create their own “Not-a-Boxes.”

Again, students created a wide range of responses to this task. And, my goodness, did they have a great time making them!

 

I’m excited to see what else my students will create as we continue to practice and build a culture of imagining possibilities!

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“Constructing” Relationships: Share & Build

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In my new role, I’ve got to learn about 400 names (insert teacher in a cold sweat just thinking about it!), which means that I’ve been starting off all of my first classes with name games. Because I’m teaching STEM, I came up with this simple little idea that achieves the dual purposes of having students introduce themselves and working together to create something.

The activity, which I’m calling Share & Build, is super simple. I put Jenga blocks into a bucket. Students passed the bucket around the circle, each taking out a block. I modeled the process by going first and sharing my name, something I like to do, and then placing my block down on a table or the floor (whichever makes the most sense for visibility.) I then chose a student to repeat the process. That student selected the next participant, until we had gone through the whole class and had created something together.

My second graders loved this activity and were highly interested in seeing how their classmates would choose to add their blocks to our classroom creation. I found it interesting to observe the way that, as the top photo shows, some classes ended up working to create a neat, orderly design, while others were more focused in looking for novel placements of the blocks. We definitely had some toppling action, which provided a good first opportunity to discuss the importance of mistakes and experimentation in STEM.

If you’re considering trying out this idea, I think that, with a smallish class, having students have two blocks each could make this activity even more engaging.